Archive for June, 2010

More Muller

June 16, 2010

No central dogmas, such as predestination, control or organize system. Instead, the structure of system arises out of the careful consideration of the obiectum theologiae. What is more, the issue of the formal character of the obiectum theologiae, the way in which it is to be considered, governs the way in which theological system can be developed following the prolegomena. Here, again, the Reformed orthodox model presses biblical norms, a Christ-centered view of Scripture, and an essentially soteriological view of the body of Christian doctrine. In addition, it draws system away from purely metaphysical interests.

Richard A. Muller, Post-Reformation Reformed Dogmatics: The Rise and Development of Reformed Orthodoxy, ca. 1520 to ca. 1725, Vol. I: Prolegomena to Theology, 2nd ed. (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker, 2006), 323.

Muller on the Reformed Orthodox & Pilgrim Theology

June 15, 2010

Not only is Christ’s knowledge of God the mediate prototype for all human knowledge of God, but in addition, the forms of human knowledge of God correspond with the conditions or states of Christ’s person: the Protestant orthodox definition of theology in terms of the theology of Christ, of the blessed, and of the earthly pilgrim, serves to emphasize the christocentric character of the saving knowledge of God, as argued in the concept of the duplex cogito Dei. Human theology, moreover, on the model of the human pilgrimage toward God, reflects Christ’s own pilgrimage of humiliation and exaltation, cross and resurrection. The christological content of the theologia viatorum reminds us of Luther’s theologia crucis, just as the christological reference of the theologia beatorum points to the proper place of the theologia gloriae — in heaven and not on earth. The theology of the blessed, then, belongs to the church triumphant, the theology of pilgrims to the church militant.

Richard A. Muller, Post-Reformation Reformed Dogmatics: The Rise and Development of Reformed Orthodoxy, ca. 1520 to ca. 1725, Vol. I: Prolegomena to Theology, 2nd ed. (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker, 2006), 258.